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the significance of a couple of phone calls with rupert murdoch. so in terms of what i think is going on here, as i said, i'm relying on what i've written in my diary, what i think is going on is that rupert murdoch has taken the call and is wanting to have a shout about what's going on. i go about the point the made earlier, it may be different from some of the other media owners is that he's a news man. he's interested in what's going on in the world. so i think that's what's going on but i can't help you beyond that because i don't remember the call. but certainly at that time it was a very -- he was in a very, very difficult position and we were all -- in terms of the decisions that were taken taken and the policy that was being pursued, it was hugely unpopular. we knew that. most of the rest of the media, because they were opposed by the war, the bbc because of the dispute we got into with them, most of the right-wing paper because they hated tony blair by then, it was a pretty difficult paper landscape. whether rupert murdoch was, well, i'm kind of the last one standing, i don't know. that's
are having some trouble. we will try to return to this story just a little later. rupert murdoch is not fit to run an international company, that was the scathing report from a group of british lawmakers today. the parliamentary select committee found that mr. murdoch's company misled parliament about the scale of phone hacking at one of his newspapers. the finding was less than unanimous. news corp. has shot back a statement, calling some of the committee's language unjustified and highly partisan. our business editor has more. >> rupert murdoch, until recently, seen as the world's most powerful media mogul. today, he was declared not a fit person to run an international business. he and his colleagues turned a blind guy for years to phone hacking by a journalist at the "news of the world." >> everybody in the world knows who is responsible for the wrongdoing. rupert murdoch. more than any individual life, he is to blame. morley, the dates are his. he paid the piper -- morally, the deeds are his. >> the former editor, the legal affairs manager for mr. murdoch's british newspaper, and mr. m
delivering justice to al qaeda. >> british lawmakers to accuse rupert murdoch of willful blindness over phone hacking. a diplomatic crisis threatens to derail a high-level talks between china and the u.s.. it is 9:00 in singapore. >> it is 2:00 in london. >> president obama has marked the anniversary of the shooting death of osama bin laden by making a surprise visit to afghanistan. he signed an agreement about the role of the u.s. after nato and its combat operations in 2014. within the past couple of hours, he delivered a presidential address from the u.s. air base. he announced the 23,000 more u.s. troops would leave this summer as the u.s. wound down its combat role. >> i will not keep americans in harm's way a single day longer than is absolutely required for our national security. we must finish the job was started in afghanistan and end this war responsibly. my fellow americans, we have traveled through more than a decade under the cloud of war. we can see the light of the new day on the horizon. the iraq war is over. the number of our troops in harm's way has been cut in half. more wi
with rupert murdoch. in terms of what i think is going on here, as i say, i'm relying on what i've written in my diary. what i think is going on is i think rupert murdoch placed a call and tony blair has taken that call, and rupert murdoch wanted to have a chat just about what was going on. i said earlier that the only thing that makes rupert murdoch different than some of the other media owners is he's a news man. he's interested in what's going on in the world. so i think that's what was going on, but i can't help you beyond that because i don't remember the call. but certainly at that time it was he was in a very, very difficult position. and we were all, in terms of the decisions that were being taken and the policy that was being pursued, it was hugely unpopular. we knew that. most of the rest of the media, either the papers on the left because they're opposed to the war, the bbc because of the dispute we got into with them, the right wing papers mostly because they hated tony blair by then, it was a pretty difficult media landscape. and whether rupert murdoch was just kind of signall
. campbell denied that there was any deal between rupert murdoch and tony blair to gain support from the british newspaper "the sun" during the 1997 election. alastair campbell served as tony blair's press secretary and later communications director from 1997 through 2003. >>> this afternoon's witness is mr. campbell, please. campbell, you're still on oath from your hearing on the 30th of november. i told you you'd be back. >> yes. >> and you provided us kindly with a second statement, dated the 30th of april of this year. and you confirm its contents as true, do you, mr. campbell? >> yes. >> i'm going to do this by way of theme, if i may, mr. campbell. first of all, mr. blair hiring you in 1994, we have one version in your diary, another version which is very similar in mr. blair's book, "the journey," page 75. he considered you as part of a short list in discussion with mr. mandelson. do you remember that? >> no. i wasn't involved in that discussion. >> it's unlikely given they were wondering whether you were the right person. >> and mr. blair said he wanted a tabloid person and th
bin ladin stead, president obama makes a surprise visit to afghanistan. ripping into rupert murdoch, he is declared not fit to lead a major company. and shining a light on the occupy movement. in new york, the activists are having an impact. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. president obama has marked the anniversary of the killing of osama bin ladin with a surprise visit to afghanistan. he announced -- he arrived unannounced under the cover of darkness. he then signed an agreement about the role of combat troops after their withdrawal. >> a dramatic appearance. the american president of rides. -- arrives. president obama left the air base and went to the presidential palace. he discussed america's continued role in the fight against global terror. >> i have come to afghanistan to mark an historic moment for our nation's. i am here to a firm the bonds between our countries, to thank american men and women who have sacrificed so much in these last 10 years. in order to ensure peace and .rosperity for our nation's president obama sends a message he hopes o
murdoch was responsible for the phone hacking scandal. >> rupert murdoch should not be running an international company like b sky b. >> shining a light on the occupy movement. they are having an impact on the world of art. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america. the president made a surprise visit to afghanistan. he is there to sign an agreement on future dealings with the country. for more on the trip and the future of relations between washington and kabul, i am joined by former u.s. defense secretary, richard cohen. he sizes agreement which marked involvement in afghanistan. 2024. what will that mean? >> that was always the plan. the notion that we would be there just for a short time, that meaning a decade. changing afghanistan on the ground will take decades and not just one. the plan was always to increase the troop level, then try to stabilize responsibility over to the army and police, reduce our presence, so we could have a prevention force that would prevent a resurgence of al qaeda, taliban, and serve to discourage the taliban from pakistan coming over into afghan
. and i think within the media marketplace rupert murdoch then had probably within the press a greater share and greater power than perhaps he does now because of all the changes that have happened with television and internet, social media and so forth. >> put another way, was it particularly important for you either to neutralize the "sun," or at least to win it over? even if the word "iconic" might be -- >> that was certainly one of the things we discuss ed that night in france and it's one of the objectives i sent myself. yeah. the neutralization strategy in a sense was to counter the influence that i had seen as a journalist whosupported the labour party and to try to ensure that we had a more level playing field where we could communicate to the public what we were trying to do and the changes we were trying to make. >> in terms of which paper was the biggest prize in terms of either the neutralization or best obtaining its support, did the sun fall into that category? >> it probably fell into the category of the only one that might as it were shift position. i couldn't have ever
corp c.e.o. rupert murdoch unfit to run his media empire. "nightly business report" is brought to you by: captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: big questions today about the leadership at two big companies-- news corp and chesapeake energy. susie, we'll have more on the issues swirling around both companies in just a moment. >> susie: meanwhile, tom, occupy wall street hoped to breathe new life into its movement with may day protests today. demonstrators marched through manhattan's financial district and protested in front of several large banks and media outlets, but in smaller numbers than marches last fall. similar protests took place other cities, including chicago, san francisco, and los angeles. he built one of the world's largest media empires. but today, rupert murdoch is being called "not fit to run" a global company. that's the conclusion of a committee of british lawmakers looking into wrongdoing by murdoch-owned newspapers in the united kingdom caught up in the phone hacking scandal, when reporters illegally obtained voicemails from celebrities and politicians. darren gersh
>> tonight ofrontline, rupert murdoch and his son engulfed in scandal... >> i think the senior executives were all misinformed and shielded from anything that was going on. >> ...and his companies plagud with questions. >> someone took charge of a cover-up which we were victim to, and i regret... >> how did the owner of a worldwide media empire come to be hounded by the press and haunted by the death of a teenager? >> that's what absolutely turned the whole thing into a complete nightmare for rupert murdoch. >> mr. murdoch, at what point did you find out that criminality was endemic at news of the world? >> "endemic" is a very... a very wide-ranging word. >> tonifrontline correspondent lowell bergman goes inside the phone hacking scandal... >> they hacked my phone and they ran some pretty hideous stories about my sexuality. >> they hacked my messages between myself and the chief executive. >> ...that rocked a governmen. >> this is becoming a very, very big scandal. biggest news organization in the country are in trouble, biggest police force in trouble, and furthermore,
, it was a pretty difficult media landscape. and whether rupert murdoch was just kind of signalling being the last one standing, i don't know. so all i can really give you is what i put in my diary on that day. but there were two -- according to the cabin offers, between 2002 and 2005, tony blair spoke to rupert murdoch six times on the telephone. two of those times were during this period, and i think it's a combination of rupert murdoch trying to figure out what's going on, and also probably just saying we're going to support you on this. does that help? >> why would he need to do that? >> he wouldn't. he wouldn't. but i think it's -- again, i can't really help you beyond what i put in my statement. but i think he was -- it was the biggest issue anywhere in the world at that time. >> i understand that, but it's -- i suppose it goes back to the whole question of the perception of the reason why this intensely difficult time which you described in which we all remember simply from what we were watching and reading about. we weren't involved in these decisions. and i can understand he's talking to
on rupert murdoch's handling of the phone-hacking scandal at one of his tabloid newspapers. the committee said the 81-year-old british tycoon's paper misled parliament during its inquiry into the scandal which -- into the scandal. hello and welcome to g.m.t. i'm george. also in the program, main-stream politicians beware from greece to france to spain. there's mounting anger over the emphasize on budget cuts. they live, work and type together but can soldiers really trust their afghan colleagues? it's 7:00 a.m. in washington. 1:00 in the afternoon in paris and midday here in london where a highly-anticipated report by british parliamentary committee has heavily criticized rupert murdoch and his son, james, over the phone hacking scandal at the now-defunct "news of the world" tabloid paper. he said he was -- said he was not a fit person to have stewardship over a major international company. >> that corporately at news world and news international misled the committee repeatedly about the true extent of the nature of the what they claimed to have carried out in decision to the phone hacki
british prime minister answered the -- answers questions about his relationship with rupert murdoch. japan's former prime minister has apologized for his failure to stop the fukushima nuclear crisis. giving evidence to a parliamentary investigation into the disaster, he revealed there was a breakdown of trust between the prime minister, other branches of government, and of the plant operator. roman philips has this report from tokyo. >> more than a year on, the work to tackle the nuclear crisis continues at the fukushima plant. the reactors have been stabilized. the concern now is the pool containing spent fuel. texaco -- tepco says it is safe. there are concerns it could collapse releasing more radiation. japan is trying to learn lessons from the disaster. he came for questioning of an inquiry set up by the parliament. he was prime minister windy crisis began. -- when the crisis began. >> nuclear power was a national project. i believe the responsibility for the nuclear accident lies with the nation. as the person responsible for the nation when the accident happened, i apologize from the
against the section on rupert murdoch, there was no evidence linking him directly to knowledge within the business. now, people may find that astonishing but nevertheless that is will the country. i think it's quite important we did draw that line. in our view we should focus on the evidence about what people in the organization new. as i said, people's failure to see the lights flashing on the dashboard at the company when they were clearly lots of warnings, problems within the organization. >> can i just very briefly, i drafted the amendment and i'm certainly not a lawyer. we follow the evidence, follow the evidence. with james murdoch, for example. given the conflicting accounts and the history of what we have been told by witnesses going five years, we simply couldn't make our minds up with any conviction about whether he misled or not, time possibly retail if other evidence emerges. it was important just to get our heads up, look at the bigger picture. because we were told that not withstanding everything that has happened, all the media revelations, including "new york times," n
. they issued a report found that rupert murdoch, said at news corporation and international is quote not a fit person to write a major corporation. this is about 10 minutes of the news conference. >> it's been 10 years one month in nine days since "news of the world" -- five days ago, rupert murdoch admitted it was a cover-up at news corporation. we found news corporation carried out an extensive cover-up of its rampant lawbreaking. its most senior executives repeatedly misled parliament, and the two men at the top, rupert and james murdoch, who were in charge of the company, must now answer for the. in the view of the majority of committee members, rupert murdoch is not fit to run an international company like bskyb. i personally am disappointed that some members didn't feel sufficiently convinced are confident to will the most powerful to account. they thought they could support sections 216-229 of the report. many hacking victims have still not been informed of what was done to them. and rupert murdoch has not said his last apology to the families of murdered children. let us also remember
, a devastating charge that rupert murdoch, perhaps the biggest media mogul on the planet, is unfit for his job. >>> family drama at the john edwards trial, the wife of the star witness is cross examined and it gets personal. >>> plus tonight, a terrific "making a difference" report. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and a special good evening to our viewers in the west tonight, as you probably heard, air force one touched down in the dark, without any visible running lights in kabul, afghanistan. an unannounced trip by president obama to the war zone that became a war zone following 9/11. tonight the president asked the television networks for air time and addressed the nation briefly from bagram air field outside kabul. there was work to be done on the ground there, and there is a lot of politics in the air surrounding this anniversary, in the context of an election year. we want to begin tonight's broadcast with our political director, chief white house correspondent chuck todd. chuck, good evening. >> reporter: the president took a 13-hour plane ri
, wrongdoing by tabloids owned by rupert murdoch, the phone hacking and the bribery of public officials. and secondly, a wider inquiry into the ethics and standards of the british media. this was what prompted by the phone hacking scandal which has been going on for seven years -- several years. host: it has culminated in many respects to questions posed to james murder, the son of will for murdoch, and rupert murdoch himself. guest: they have given evidence. they were summoned to by levinson, who has subpoena power. host: we want to talk to melanie sloan about impact here in the u.s.. [video clip] >> we hired a law firm to look into this and aid our cooperation with the police. after the charging you -- not the arrest -- that was it, they were close to the files. i can't believe they would have done that and they were unhappy with our cooperation. >> that is not evidence we have had at all, mr. murdoch. it demonstrates the law firm you mention produced just one document, which you know, to not represent the position at all. one way or another, news international being obstructive. does
corporate findings against news, international. one thing in relation to those findings. rupert murdoch himself who founded the organization has been the director of news international and not just of news corp.. one thing we set out is the human cost of phone hacking and other wrongdoing to which i contributed. it was not just a technical trip, a victimless potential crime, but the human cost is laid bare in some of the statements agreed finally by news corp. in open court and wayside one part of those statements that -- that of charlotte church and her family. >> thank you. the report talks about our astonishment at the failure of the company to investigate fully and uncover incidents of phone hacking from the period of the court and taylor settlement through 2010 and 2011. there were plenty of flights flashing on the dashboard to suggest a greater investigation was needed. i am looking at the pivotal role of james murdoch in the gordon taylor case, we have been minded to follow precisely the evidence we were given, which does not contradict anything he said to the committee and there
newspapers issued a report yesterday finding that rupert murdoch, the head of news corporation international, is, quote, not a fit person to run a major corporation. the culture media and sport committee released the report during an hour, 15-minute news conference. >> i hope that you have by now had a time to read the committee's report. um, i intend just to give a brief summary of the committee's conclusions and then one or two of my colleagues wish to make brief statements before we move to questions. i should first say that the report concentrates, um, not entirely but in large part on the issue of whether this committee was misled in the evidence that it received principally during its 2009 inquiry. although we do go on to draw, obviously, wider conclusions. it is also important to say that the committee has not made any comment about the knowledge or the involvement or the evidence of any individuals who have been arrested. we have deliberately refrained from doing so because we are conscious of risk that any comment might produce a possible criminal trial. having said that, the commit
" and his international misled parliament. they did not find evidence to suggest rupert murdoch or his son james misled the committee. members were divided over language that said corporate murdoch's unfit to run a major international company. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> you have by now had time to read the committee. the report. we will make brief statements before we move to questions. i should say that the report concentrates not entirely but in large part on the issue of whether this committee was misled in the evidence it received press of play during its 2009 inquiry. although we go on to draw wider conclusions. it is important to say that the committee has not made any comment about the knowledge or the evidence of any individuals who have been arrested. we have deliberately refrained from doing so because we are conscious of a risk that any comments [unintelligible] might bring a possible criminal trial. the committee did conclude unanimously that les hinton misled the committee in 2009 in not telling the truth about the payments made to clyde goodman and his role in author
but not cozy. he has been accused of being too close to rupert murdoch during this time in power. our political correspondent has been working the inquiry and is with us now. when have we learned from tony blair? >> he began with a guilty plea because he said that 21st came into office it had crossed his mind he could do something about the influence that the newspapers wielded in public life, but he decided against doing that. he said otherwise it would have on least a long and protracted battle for the government and the consequences for politicians could of been harsh. >> it's very important not to see this as simply about the murdoch media. with any of these big media groups, you fall out with them and you watch out, because it is unrelenting once that happens. my view is that is what creates the situation in which the media people get a power in the system that is not guilty and which i felt throughout my time uncomfortable with. i took the decision and this could be subject to criticism, and i took a strategic decision to manage this, not to confront it. but the power is inconceivable. >>
risk with pradaxa. >>> coming up more than any individual alive, rupert murdoch is to blame for the wrongdoing news corp. but first mitt romney gets heckled by a protester complemented by his wife and gets a parrot named pacco. >> mitt romney quotes that the nation's 50 million hispanic voters this week by introducing pacco. >> mitt romney cares about jobs, education. >> this is a wild and crazy man inside of there. >> we are two wild and crazy guys. >> you often come and hear people that have come to an event where mitt romney is at and they go i relate to him. >> mitt romney you are a racist! mitt romney, you are a racist! >> that's the noisetive, and that's not accurate. >> i made a joke about barbara walters, and apparently she was unamused. >> 16 years ago there was no facebook google and the tweet was something barbara walters gave her dog. >> i didn't mean to upset you barbara, it was little joke and fit offended you i'm very sorry. >> i'm a very busy man. >> we need to convince the american people to do something difficult. >> he is our first af
the gasoline station and the farmer delivering a pizza because he needs to get it delivered. >>> rupert murdoch has been found unfit to run a major international company. big question now, is he going to be forced to step down from his media emtire as he does run a major internet company and a big get real to a couple who decided to tow their 7-year-old granddaughter behind an suv. didn't work so well pretty much for anyone at all. here's will cain playlist, john cruz "halawe." am i right about that? >> i think so. need any help? uh, nope. just, uh, checking out my ad. can >>> okay, that's tom wait's "squo "jockey full of bourbon." >> you missed the first vocals. >> too slow. can i get some gospel and get people moving. yeah, a little slow. >> i've heard some gospel. >> let's play that. our "get real" this morning. every day i have my favorite story, not always a get real and it is no different today we talk about two florida grandparents from sarasota, florida, now under arrest because they took their granddaughter on kind of a wild ride, paul and gelind gelinde berloni accused of strapping th
right now. welcome, everybody, wreaking news to get to first, rupert murdoch and his media empire deliberately misled the british parliament about the scope of that phone hacking scandal at the now defunct "news of the world" tabloid, a finding that has just come in from a committee of lawmakers in london. their report was released in the last hour and concludes "the behavior of the news international certain witnesses in the affair demonstrated contempt in the most blatant fashion. they went on saying rupert is not a fit person to run an international company, they could prompt regulators to force murdoch to sell his controlling stake in british sky broadcasting. we'll have more straight ahead. we begin with that breaking news. >>> also today fears that al qaeda could try to explode explosives hidden inside the bodies of terrorists. the warning comes on the one-year anniversary of the death of osama bin laden. reports in america and the middle east have been stepped up as we get new intelligence with hints at potential and future al qaeda threats. german agents found a memory chi
rupert murdoch had mentioned this company to the prime minister. and the prime minister, as i recall, we did have a discussion about whether there was anything wrong with him raising it. and then he didn't raise it until this another this phone call came along and he mentioned it and prody said to the words of the effect that murdoch is waf wasting his time and i don't think it went any further. >> but the origin of all of this kerfuffle was an express request by mr. murdoch, presumably made referring to the prime minister to intervene in a certain way. >> no, i don't think -- he was trying to establish whether words to the effect he was wasting his time trying to get into the italian marketplace. >> but even if it wasn't to intervene in a way which would necessarily produce direct results, at least to ascertain how the italian marketplace looked, should he put his toe in the water. that's what it amounted to, wasn't it? >> i wasn't privy to the call that he had and nor until this story blew up was i privy to the call with mr. prody. but i stood on that line for over several pretty lengt
why they think rupert murdoch is not fit to run a company, and theyer mp to explain why think he is fit? to those that are found guilty willsleading parliament, you take them to the parliamentary sell, or what is the punishment? theell, in terms of what consequences are, to some extent, not for the first time come at this committee is exploring uncharted water. we have gone as far as to say wethere will be others with more knowledge and experience. >> we made the decision yesterday. given an amendment. as you all know, the description is something to consider when deciding whether to give a broadcast license. it is a very decisive definition. -- precise definition. the committee is making a judgment based on the regulation in the u.k., and that was not something we investigated. you may have personal opinions hist report murdoch and company, but that was not something we were in a position we thought to make a judgment on. it was an opinion presented. that is what we agreed on in unanimity. >> the alternative you? -- view. >> the reason i support the statement that he is an unfit
witnesses has said that, you know, without rupert murdoch's support we couldn't have done the iraq war. complete nonsense. tony blair believed in what we were doing and the government supported what was being done and so did parliament. and that was way, way, way more important than any newspaper support. >> all right. that's probably convenient then to take just a break. >> all rise. >> i think you want to correct something you said in relation to the five pledges in the labor party -- >> yeah, five pledges, i checked, it was not. but it was announced before the article. >> okay. i have 53 of your statements. the back door point. you say, there tends to be a media presence in downing street most of the time. there's no particular need or desire to advertise a meeting. makes sense to avoid the front door. but not transparent, that, some would say. >> i'd accept that. >> then you say, slightly tongue in cheek, partly our thinking was for the rest of the media, murdoch was uniquely newer ral jurisdiction. >> it's not tongue in cheek, it's what we thought. rue better murdoch went into the
strongest end of influence. would that be fair? >> yeah, i think in rupert murdoch's case it would be because of the point you make. if you sort of analyze power/influence year by year over the last four decades, as you say he's been a big player throughout that time. for example, i can remember being struck once in a discussion with george bush asking what rupert murdoch was like because he never met him. which i found quite surprising. and whether he's met him since, i don't know. but that was -- i think when rupert murdoch went to the committee and said, i wish these guys would leave me alone, i think that was a little disingenuous because i think he is interested in powerful people, people who make the decisions, make the news. i see it as a different sort of power. i think political power -- i think the political class is kind of to some extent ceded too much on this ground and needs to get it back. >> in other aspects of the relationship between the media and politicians and obviously vice versa, touched on in the phyllis report which we looked at this morning under tab 21 in
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 396 (some duplicates have been removed)